Fibre optic cable

Understanding the switch to IP

Change is upon us. It’s time for the UK to switch from the traditional, analogue phone network to a new digital version.

Understanding the switch to IP

Change is upon us. It’s time for the UK to switch from the traditional, analogue phone network to a new digital version.

Fibre optic cable

The switch to IP impacts businesses and households alike. You may be aware of the switch, but decoding the tech-heavy terminology involved with the move to IP (Internet Protocol) solutions can seem like mission impossible. 

Businesses need to act now to avoid disruption. But how do you know where to start, and what do all these terms mean?

Making the switch

Our existing traditional phone network is being replaced with a newer, shinier version.

Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) is a legacy platform using underground copper wires to enable communication. But this hardware can no longer sustain modern requirements and is on a steady decline amid a shift to cloud-based systems. 

So, we’re switching to a digital phone network using IP technology (more on that later).

Here’s three important terms you might come across:

ISDN

Alongside PSTN, ISDN – or Integrated Services Digital Network – lines are being put to bed. Back in 1986, some older analogue landlines were replaced with ISDN, improving the service and adding features that weren’t available with the traditional telephone system. Although it was an upgrade at the time, ISDN is now outdated and unable to compete with IP technology.

Stop sell

A term used to describe an end to the sale of traditional phone line services, including copper and Fibre to the Cabinet (FTTC). These traditional networks aren’t suitable for the transition to digital, and so no new services will be offered nationwide by September 2023. It’s worth noting that although traditional phone lines will no longer be available to purchase or make changes to, we will continue to provide maintenance support until the switch off.

Switch off

Otherwise known as stop serve, or the final stage of the switch to IP, this just means switching off the existing analogue network. By the end of December 2025, PSTN will cease to exist. Any remaining services that have not switched to the new digital network will be lost.

Digital city

What is all-IP?

The way we work has changed. Employees expect flexibility, customers want service on demand, and the move to all-IP will provide the perfect platform to support this. All-IP refers to the switch to the new digital network that uses IP across a fibre-based service.

Our all-IP solutions enable broadband-connected devices to communicate and transmit data. While greater bandwidth means it’s better equipped for modern business needs, it also means businesses will no longer pay by the minute for phone calls and will get better value from their network.

Plus, you can expect reduced energy costs, better collaboration via linking apps with video chat, and the ability to scale as your business changes. 

We’ve outlined the all-IP acronyms you need to know: 

FTTP stands for Fibre to the Premises

This is the new network currently being built by Openreach to enable the upgrade to digital, with greater speeds and improved reliability. In fact, this all-IP solution is the fastest type of fibre on the market. It is considered ‘full fibre’ – offering a dedicated fibre optic cable connection. Crucially, when FTTP becomes available to 75% of properties in a specific location, the traditional phone network will be switched off. 

VoIP stands for Voice over Internet Protocol

This is a big one: VoIP enables phones to be connected to the internet wirelessly or with an ethernet cable. Our VoIP systems upgrade your business comms, allowing you to replace expensive legacy hardware with a flexible cloud phone system. Not only does this support hybrid working, but it helps your team offer a more personal customer experience.

Woman working at home

SoGEA stands for Single Order Generic Ethernet Access

This is essentially broadband without the landline and requires VoIP to make and receive calls. This is a great alternative where FTTP is not yet available. Because you won’t need the PSTN line, you’ll be up and running in no time. Plus, you still get our fast speeds, far-reaching coverage and a simple, streamlined process.

Woman on a video call

The future of voice calls is digital

Understanding the right terminology is key to knowing how to get started, and what the process involves. The transition will happen at some point – that’s a given – but there’s a real advantage for businesses in getting ahead of the game.

 

Avoiding last-minute panic is one benefit, but ultimately: why wouldn’t you want your business to reap the rewards sooner rather than later?

 

BT has broken down what will happen during the switch in more detail – including how we ensure a seamless swap – in our latest eBooks.

The future of voice calls is digital

Understanding the right terminology is key to knowing how to get started, and what the process involves. The transition will happen at some point – that’s a given – but there’s a real advantage for businesses in getting ahead of the game.

 

Avoiding last-minute panic is one benefit, but ultimately: why wouldn’t you want your business to reap the rewards sooner rather than later?

 

BT has broken down what will happen during the switch in more detail – including how we ensure a seamless swap – in our latest eBooks.

Woman on a video call

The future of voice calls is digital

Understanding the right terminology is key to knowing how to get started, and what the process involves. The transition will happen at some point – that’s a given – but there’s a real advantage for businesses in getting ahead of the game.

 

Avoiding last-minute panic is one benefit, but ultimately: why wouldn’t you want your business to reap the rewards sooner rather than later?

 

BT has broken down what will happen during the switch in more detail – including how we ensure a seamless swap – in our latest eBooks.

Woman on a video call

The future of voice calls is digital

Understanding the right terminology is key to knowing how to get started, and what the process involves. The transition will happen at some point – that’s a given – but there’s a real advantage for businesses in getting ahead of the game.

 

Avoiding last-minute panic is one benefit, but ultimately: why wouldn’t you want your business to reap the rewards sooner rather than later?

 

BT has broken down what will happen during the switch in more detail – including how we ensure a seamless swap – in our latest eBooks.

Woman on a video call
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